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List songs by Song title | Performer | Year

You searched for ‘jazzy’, which matched 67 songs.
click - person recommending, year, performer, songtitle - to see more recommendations.
37 Hours (In The U.S.A.)  performed by Raw Stylus  1995
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

Raw Stylus effortlessly combined british acid jazz elements with sophisticated, elegant Steely Dan-esque american jazz/soul/funk. In fact, like on this track, the music sounds very much like a Steely Dan backing track with warm Fender Rhodes keyboards, precise horn section, funky rhythm section and jazzy guitars. Which really isn't much of a wonder when looking at the credits of the album. Let's see: The album is impeccably produced by the Dan's producer Gary Katz, features an incredible amount of fine session musicians including Steely Dan regulars (like Bernard Purdie, Randy Brecker or Hugh McCracken), has even Donald Fagen providing synths on "37 Hours (In The U.S.A.) and they even embedded some chords of "Josie" in the song. Unfortunately, despite the talent, Raw Stylus remained a one album band to this very day, kinda sad actually...

from Pushing Against The Flow (Geffen 24822), available on CD



A Hard Day’s Night  performed by Goldie Hawn  1998
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

A perfect straight-forward jazzy take on the Beatles' classic. Goldie is in peak performance and reminds me of Michelle Pfeiffer in 'Fabulous Baker Boys' on this song.

from George Martin - In My Life (MCA/Universal 11841), available on CD


absent friend  performed by Bark Psychosis  1994
Recommended by anarhikos [profile]

A masterpiece of post rock genre! cheerful, jazzy, incredible sound..it takes you to another world..

from Hex


All U Can Eat  performed by Ben Folds  2003
Recommended by snoodlededoogans [profile]

"as political a song as I got" - says Ben Folds.
a quieter bouncy jazzy song where Ben sings to his son about how fucked up the world is. they point and laugh at the ignorance and consumption of most of the world. two verses and a solo or two, a short song comes together for his EP, Sunny 16. here's hoping he'll revisit it and flesh it out with another verse for the promised album...

from Sunny 16 (Epic/Sony)


Always something there to remind me  performed by Gals and Pals  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An unusual take on this classic Burt Bacharach tune, more commonly heard sung by Sandie Shaw. This Swedish vocal group adds a musical phrase to the song which adds something to the atmosphere. The incredibly wide vocal range of the group is used to full effect. The result is a very appealing mixture of 60s pop and vocal jazz.

from Sing somethin for everyone (Fontana SRF67557)




  tempted: Check out the brand new debut album, "Melody a.m." by a Norwegian act called Royksopp. On the track "So Easy" they sample "Blue on Blue" recorded by the Gals&Pals and use it absolutely beautifully to create a haunting masterpiece.
  delicado: cool; I love their 'blue on blue', and will check it out, thanks.
  daedalia: yup, Royksopp did it well which is why i am at this page. Stunning album.
  daedalia: forgot: does anyone know where i can get blue on blue, what album??
  delicado: 'blue on blue' is on the same album, 'Sing somethin for everyone'; I believe (although I'll have to check) that it's also on the inexpensive Swedish compilation of Gals and Pals, 'Guldkorn'.
  masayo: Wow...I was moved. Much more impressed than Sandie Shaw's version. I want to listen to the whole track.
  tuktman: Bobby Vinton has a version of Blue on Blue, i think it might be his song, just found a 30second clip of it, between gals and pals and royksopp it's been changed a bit
  ashie259: There's also a 1963 Dutch-language version of Blue On Blue by Rob de Nijs called Stil Verdriet. There's a short clip on YouTube of it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iP_PgEysRH4
Are You There (With Another Girl)  performed by Anita Kerr Singers  1969
Recommended by scrubbles [profile]

This is one of my favorite Bacharach-David songs. It would be difficult to top Dionne Warwick's original, but Anita Kerr's jazzy cover comes awfully close. Kerr's arrangement is more muted and pretty - and when the drums kick in between chorus and verse, the results are breathtaking. Real cool!

from Reflect on the Hits of Burt Bacharach and Hal David (Dot)
available on CD - Reflect on the Hits of Burt Bacharach and Hal David/Velvet Voices and Bold Brass



  delicado: I was just about to recommend this. Isn't it a superb version!
Blowin' Bubbles  performed by Call and Response  2001
Recommended by ronaldo [profile]

Just a perfect, perfect pop song. Makes you wanna dance and groove along, but at the same time it's soo unbelievably sweet and a just a liitle melancholy. It starts with a drum beat, and then there's this bass-and-drums groove for a few seconds. Then a little sweet electric piano line enters, just before the voice begins singing the melody: "I'm drinking stars up in the sky, you know where you are / I'm driving cars around your house, it seems so fun". When it's time for the chorus ("So listen to my bubble go pop / I'm coming in, I'm coming over the top"), the main voice sings over a backing vocal doing an "ooh" harmony, and then there's absolute genius backing vocal, where the word "pop" becomes "papapapa". After that, a little guitar riff/solo, along with a very cool electric piano line. Then it just repeats everything all over again one more time, for infinite happiness. The time for a middle break has arrived. A new funky bass groove with lots of different "papapa"s harmonizing together. Now, go back to the first bass-and-drums groove, with a jazzy, relaxed guitar solo, and then it's just grooves and grooves and heavenly harmonies, "Blowin' bubbles".




Boogie Oogie Oogie  performed by A Taste of Honey  1978
Recommended by ambassador [profile]

One of the most nonsensical song title ever, yes, I know and much derided for that reason, but to quote Otis Redding when told his lyrics didn't make any sense, "I'm gonna worry about settin' the groove. I get that groove going, they don't care what I say." Boogie Oogie2 has got groove to spare, with a jazzy intro (similar to Boogie Nights by Heatwave) before that bass line drops in shakes the floorboards. Just like all the dance craze songs of the 60s, the disco era about vocals were mostly used as a counterpoint to the rhythm section. The Mizell brothers add a touch of sophistication to this female-led band (Hazel Payne and Janice Marie Johnson on bass and guitar - they're the ones on the awesome album cover) which is a step further in the commercial direction after their work with Jazz Funk kings like Donald Byrd, Gary Bartz and Johnny Hammond. This song is up there with G.Q.'s "Disco Nights (Rock Freak)" and anything by Chic in the sophisticated disco category.

from A Taste of Honey (Capitol)


Born at the Right Time  performed by Erin Bode
Recommended by valcalma [profile]

A remake of the Paul Simon song, Erin Bode takes the words and adds a soft, jazzy sound to it.




C'est Pas De Ma Faute  performed by Brigitte Fontaine
Recommended by djfreshmoney [profile]

Great loungey beat that's dying to be sampled. This is early Brigitte Fontaine and it reminds the folks at Dusty Groove of early Serge Gainsbourg. I agree. Cool upbeat jazzy beat with emotive singing. Wish I spoke French. The only problem with this song is that it's too short.

from 17 Chansons Décadentes




  jeanette: Ha! If you think this song is too short, you wanna catch the Vous Et Nous album with Areski: millions of songs, most clocking in under 3 mins, many under 1. And they look like primary school teachers on the cover. Good call; brilliant tune.
Catolé  performed by Orquestra Jean Kelson  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This is a jazzy, haunting track from an LP I bought in Brazil last year. I've tried hard to find information about Jean Kelson, but the only mention I've found (other than those I've made myself) is in one of Ed Motta's excellent archived radio shows at his official site (http://www2.uol.com.br/edmotta/sala.htm). Ed plays a different track from this album, Munganga.

Catolé sounds musically like a variation of Baden Powell's classic 'Berimbau', and opens with an incredibly catchy refrain featuring piano, percussion and trumpet. Gentle male voices then come in and flesh out the melody. The entire album is great. I wonder what the chances are of it coming out on CD...

from Berimbau e Bigorrilho (Copacabana CLPS 21012)



cherokee  performed by pierrick pedron  2000
Recommended by thorltd1984 [profile]

This nice slightly avant-gardish jaz track i found on a cd for 2 euro's.

from Cherokee (elabeth ela 621036)


Cinnamon and Clove  performed by Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A beautiful take on this tune, which sounds as if it were made for the group. The sound is typical of Sergio Mendes’s work - a strong driving bossa nova beat, a beautifully clean piano arrangement, and tasteful vocals.

from Sergio Mendes and Brasil 66 (A&M SP4122)



clarinets/love scene  performed by gonsalez  2000
Recommended by olli [profile]

i've always had a weakness for clarinets. especcialy in jazzy hip hop-influenced chillout music. love the lady-sample.fits comfortably next to the following track, "love scene", too.
a nice bit of incidental music for your life.

from gonzales uber alles (kitty-yo)



Comin’ Home Baby  performed by Claus Ogerman  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This track wasn't what I expected. My previous favorite version of this song (although I have many) was probably the one by Mel Torme on his 1962 album 'Right Now'. And since that version was arranged by Ogerman, I had expected this version to be simply an instrumental version like Torme's recording - a cool, finger-clicking, jerky pop number. In fact, there's something much cooler and more sophisticated about this version.

The tune is picked out first by an organ, and then by the brass and woodwinds before returning to the organ, which then jams around the main tune. A really beautiful string section comes in early on, creating some unusual chords that really add to the song and work very well alongside the 'cool' effect of the organ and rhythm. I wish Claus had recorded more songs with this mixture of percussion, jazzy instrumentation and lovely thick string parts. A few tracks on one of his other 60s LPs, 'Latin Rock,' come close, but I'm not sure any of them are as nice as this one.

from Soul Searchin' (RCA LPM 3366)



Cucumbe  performed by Edda Dell’Orso  1975
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

Italian singer Edda dell'Orso is the voice backing many soundtrack scores and lounge-beat tracks by Ennio Morricone, Alessandro Alessandroni, Armando Trovajoli (and his 'Mark 4'). This is a Cinecitta-composer Romolo Grano composition for the cult fantasy-drama TV-series 'La Montagna della Luce'. A very deeply and sensually voiced Edda accompanies the slightly latin-flavoured, percussive funky-jazz piece; the haunting funky bassline and a very gentle tenor present throughout the track complete this exotic, obscure jazzy soundtrack.


available on CD - Up!!! The Second (Schema (Italy))


Dream On Dreamer  performed by Brand New Heavies  1994
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

The Brand New Heavies were one of the significant groups of the then popular "Acid Jazz" sound in the early 90s. "Dream On Dreamer" still strikes me with it's precisely executed funk rhythm and lush production: Tight rhythm section with funky drums, guitar and bass combined with jazzy piano chords, swirling strings and a crisp brass section. On top of that some flutes, fluegelhorn, percussion and organ with a very pleasant vocal performance by N'Dea Davenport.

from Brother Sister, available on CD



Eden Rock  performed by Fifth Avenue Band  1969
Recommended by gregcaz [profile]

Another stunner from an album full of them, "Eden Rock" finds common ground between folk-rock and quiet storm, sounding very ahead of its time. Piano, congas, bass, Spanish guitar and a smoooove lead vocal over jazzy changes mark this as a lost classic. It anticipates many of the paths that 70s pop, rock and R&B would follow. Two minutes and twenty-five seconds of joy.

from Fifth Avenue Band (Reprise RS 6369)


Eleanor Rigby  performed by Oscar Peterson  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Eleanor Rigby does not immediately seem like the kind of song which would sound good as a cover version, but this fantastic version by Oscar Peterson proves otherwise. It opens with a simply heavenly string sequence from Claus Ogerman. Then Peterson’s gentle and percussive piano comes in backed with an driving bossa nova guitar and a huge, rich string arrangement. The tempo then switches over to a more jazzy style with a walking bass.

from Motions and Emotions (MPS 21207137)




  n-jeff: For a version on another tack theres Enoch Lights' (I can't remember if its from Spaced Out or Brass Menagerie 73). But its a cracker. Driving bass, swinging horns and electric guitar taking it to a whole groovy level the Beatles wouldn't imagined for their ballad.
Elle a... elle a pas...  performed by Michel Legrand  1965
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A very cool and swinging jazzy pop vocal. Michel's range is quite remarkable, and there are some cool backing vocals too. About halfway through of the song, some completely over the top scat vocals kick in, and two different vocal Michels carry out a nonsensical scat 'conversation' until the end. Definitely an unusual way to complete a song, but it works fantastically.


available on CD - Le Meilleur de Michel Legrand (Philips France)



Empty Pages  performed by Traffic  1970
Recommended by geezer [profile]

Classic period Traffic ,soulful vocals ,jazzy electric piano and funky flute .Never soaring but gently uplifting on a sunny morning.

from John Barleycorn Must Die, available on CD


Everyone, Under the Sun  performed by Ashley Park  2000
Recommended by saturnhead [profile]

More from Canada's Ashley Park Spin Magazine, Uncut, Billboard, and Magnet all rave "Beatles, Bacharach, Kinks"...This song is a jazzy take on that uber hip college sound.

from Town and Country, available on CD


Fire and Rain  performed by John Gregory  1972
Recommended by delicado [profile]

In my experience John Gregory is one of the most consistently superb British arrangers of the 60s and 70s. I've never really heard anything I didn't like by him, although I understand that he was very prolific and that I've barely scratched the surface so far.

His arrangements have simultaneously a bite and a beauty that few others were able to match. Although not much of his work is available on CD, there's one excellent disc, 'Mission Impossible and other themes', that compiles most of his 'big band crime jazz' work, dating from the early 1960s to the mid 1970s. The disc isn't very excitingly packaged and can be had very cheaply, but it's full of outstanding tracks.

'Fire and Rain' is from a 70s album (I have it on a Philips sampler from the early 70s), and is a sumptuously arranged instrumental in the vein of some of the work of other British arrangers of the era, such as Johnny Harris and John Schroeder.

Of course, the song was written and originally recorded by James Taylor. His track is quite nice, but maybe it helped that I came to this version 'fresh', without having heard the original. This happens to me a lot, and Gregory's full arrangement and jazzy touches definitely elevate the track for me.

The melody is carried by a beautifully played trumpet, and later by the strings. There's a strong beat throughout, and a particularly groovy break towards the end with some great brass.

from Gregory Conducts... (Philips)



flickorna i småland  performed by delta rythm boys  195?
Recommended by olli [profile]

apparently the delta rythm boys were quite big in sweden in the late fifties, something wich eventually led to them recording this quirky little song. it's a jazzy take on an old swedish folk song, including the swedish lyrics. however, the vocalists didn't speak the language at the time of the recording, so the result turned out to be remarkably strange. still, it´s a fantastic song, and even if you don't understand swedish (well, most people don't) i think you'll appreciate this. it's pretty tough to come by unless you happen live next to a swedish thrift store, but it´s well worth hunting down. i first heard it on the in-film soundtrack to the film "kitchen stories"(salmer fra kjøkkenet) by bent hamer.
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0323872/
i don´t think there's a soundtrack cd out, but the complete song plays during the end credits, and can easily be ripped. (the film is well worth seeing too, if you can stand subtitles, i recommend ordering it)






  bloozshooz: This tune was recorded Aug. 1, 1951, according to a Swedish discography found via Google
  bloozshooz: This tune was recorded Aug. 1, 1951, according to a Swedish discography found via Google
  mettemaj: CDon.com has a compilation of Swedish evergreens from concerts in folkparkerna (the public/folk parks) - and Delta Rythm Boys' Flickorna i Småland is on it alongside tunes sung by e.g. Lill-Babs, Siw Malmkvist and Cornelis Vreeswijk (Search for "Guldkorn Från Folkparkerna 100 År" at http://www.cdon.com/main.phtml?navroot=903&session=1).
  Timpsi: Delta Rythm Boys also had a CD in the Finnish "20 suosikkia" ('20 favourites') series, and "Flickorna i Småland" can be found on it too. Other interesting songs on the album are a couple of Finnish language songs, and rare English versions of Finnish classics, such as "Rosvo-Roope" ('Raunchy Ropey'), and "Isoisän olkihattu" ('Grandpa's Strawhat'). At the time of recording the CD, the Boys received some Finnish language schooling from a Harmony Sisters member. The CD is most definitely out of print already, but is available at several Finnish public libraries. Some more information at http://www.fono.fi/Dokumentti.aspx?kappale=flickorna+i+sm%c3%a5land&ID=21a6f890-e470-4992-a847-31a5d67ae46d
Going out of My Head  performed by Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A wonderful version of “Going out of my head”, which was originally sung by Little Anthony and the Imperials. It's a great song anyway, with really nice words (well, nice for a Smiths fan like me, anyway: 'there's no reason why...my being shy...should keep us apart...'), but Sergio Mendes also adds an extra musical edge to the chorus, and this really adds a new dimension to the song. The instrumentation is classic Brasil 66: Percussive jazz piano, group vocals, and a driving bossa nova beat.

from Sergio Mendes and Brasil 66 (A&M SP4116)




  whoops: I totally agree with you. Their version of Caetalo Veloso's Lost in paradise is also quite wonderful.
Hot Heels  performed by Vocal shades and tones  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

This track opens with a twinkling sound, and a thick chord carried by harmonized vocals. It quickly builds into a ‘Mission Impossible’–like jazzy groover, with piano and bongos. Although this seems to owe a great debt to Lalo Schifrin, the overall sound is somehow very different and refreshing.


available on CD - Up! The Psycho Mellow (Schema)




  jezandliz1: Not sure why this has been listed in the French section as Barbara Moore is, I think, English. The whole album is fantastic though for fans of wordless female voices like Edda Dell'Orsa and a dreamy long-forgotten-summer vibe. Worth every penny of the steep import(Japanese_)cost.
  n-jeff: Barbara Moore was the go-to gal for wordless vocals on the UK session scene, she did soem great work on things like "Sort of Soul" by Birds and Brass etc.
I am music  performed by Common
Recommended by MauMau [profile]

A jazzy upbeat song. Just a little hip-hop to add to the mix.

from Electric Circus


In the Name of Love  performed by Kenny Rankin  1975
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

My track of choice in the excellent Silver Morning 1975 LP of this distinguished singer/songwriter. To the best of my knowledge, this is not a cover version, but a shining original. It comes in swinging 3/4 time, it's the most jazzy of the LP's tracks, it has a kinda dramatic soundtrack feel, it's simply great!

from Silver Morning (Little David)



  konsu: Great album. I love the versions of "Penny Lane" & "Berimbau" as well! James Taylor, eat your heart out!
International Flight  performed by David Snell  1973
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

An incredible harp track that lives up to the title, establishing a late 60s/early 70s jet set lounge mood right from the beginning. Backed by a jazzy rhythm section with just bass, drums and some sparse guitar work it's due to Snell's melodic, dreamlike, almost etheral harp playing that makes the track so evocative. I was pleased to see the track was just selected by the Thievery Corporation as an opener on their compilation album "The Outernational Sound", good choice i must say.

from The Sound Gallery Vol. 2, available on CD




  nighteye: Oh yes this track is awesome, I love the dreamy harp sound. Be sure to bring this track on your next international flight!
It’s For You  performed by Cilla Black  1964
Recommended by Doctor Mod [profile]

I'm no Cilla fan. While I've enjoyed many of her recordings, she was no match as an artist for such contemporaries as Dusty Springfield, Dionne Warwick, Lulu, or even Pet Clark, Sandie Shaw, and Jackie DeShannon, all who did very similar material. Still, Cilla had one advantage the others didn't, Lennon-McCartney tunes written with her in mind. I think the Beatles, who knew her well, understood her vocal limitations and provided songs that would show her to best advantage.
"It's For You" is certainly one of the finest recordings she ever made. Its jazzy arrangement, the edgy key changes, and the tempo shifts are as sophisticated as they were unique in 1960s Britpop. The music contributes to a sense of intrigue to the clever, ironic lyrics that pretend to dismiss love only to give it. Cilla rises to the occasion, giving what might well be her best performance ever--stunning!




It'll Never Happen Again  performed by Tim Hardin  1966
Recommended by G400 Custom [profile]

This wonderful record is the closest I've heard to an American Nick Drake. Very short and jazzy, acoustic guitar, vibraphone, impeccable white soul vocals... what more do you need? Good if you like Tim Buckley. That someone could be this good on their debut album is little short of incredible. Heroin victim Hardin's second album is even better.

from Tim Hardin
available on CD - Tim Hardin 1/2 (Repertoire)


It's My Life  performed by Talk Talk  1984
Recommended by Mike [profile]

This song is one I remember enjoying greatly as soon as I heard it shortly after its release as a single. To me it encapsulated perfectly the angst and frustration I often felt at that time. It did this as much through its sophisticated musical content and texture as through the lyrics. Listening to it now, it's as good an example as any of how different synth sounds go in and out of fashion. Hollis gives a typically intense vocal performance, and there are subtle hints in some of the instrumental lines of the more jazzy direction the band would later take. Highly recommended - don't miss this one. Oh, sorry - wrong site. Thought I saw the word Ebay somewhere.

from It's My Life (EMI)


Lavender Thursday  performed by Nanette Natal  196?
Recommended by konsu [profile]

A lost folk-jazz classic. I remember hearing this the first time and thinking that Portishead must have used this as a schematic for their live album.Spooky art-school-chick folkie lyrics with lush,velvety arrangements by an enigmatic Leon Salem. Jazzy and very passionate!



from Yesterday,Today,Tomorrow (Vangaurd VSD-6508 (OOP))



Light My Fire  performed by Shirley Bassey  1970
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

Prior to hearing her "Something" LP, I always referred to Dame Shirley as "The Godzilla of Song". By this I meant I always felt she treated a tune the way Rodan treated Tokyo, like something to be smashed underfoot. While I lived/died by her Bond themes, and such like, I never thought she was capable of nuance, restraint, and/or sexiness. Then I heard this god-like album, brilliantly produced and arranged by Johnny Harris. This cover of The Doors' song perfectly sums up the record's strengths. It's jazzy, sexy, incredibly funky, yet still totally Dame Shirley in all her over-the-top-glory. Probably the best Doors cover ever (though Nico's toxic reading of "The End", and Siouxsie and The Banshees' strangely Motown-esque version of "You're Lost Little Girl" come awfully close.)

from Something, available on CD


Lost In The Paradise  performed by Gal Costa  1969
Recommended by Mr Steal [profile]

From one of the key Tropicalia albums, a typically genius Veloso composition, with a jazzy but vaguely psychedelic feel, sung in gorgeously beguiling style (and in English!) by Gal. Actually, this whole LP is essential. (note: in London there seem to be a lot of vinyl pressings – of dubious legality – of vintage Brazilian LPs around at the moment. Sound quality is sometimes iffy, but most of this stuff is hard to find on CD).

from Gal Costa (Philips R765.068L)




  delicado: a fantastic recording; thanks for drawing my attention to it. Sergio Mendes and Brasil 66 do a great version on their 1970 'Stillness' album as well.
Love Love Love  performed by Tony Love  2003
Recommended by tlmusic [profile]

It's what the world needs to heal

from It's All About Love (T.L.M.P.)
available on CD - Its All About Love (T.L.M.P.)


Macumba  performed by Nicos Jaritz Sextet  1978
Recommended by human-cannonball [profile]

The famous Austrian percussionist Nicos Jaritz recorded a local best-seller LP in 1978 called 'Macumba', full of percussion-heavy jazzy pieces with a latin feel. This is the title track, a haunting flamengo-flavoured mid-tempo jazzy groove with a flawless interplay between a heart-breaking Spanish guitar and a tenorsax solo. I haven't been exposed to many tunes like this, it's really most entertaining, and very, very fresh-sounding!

from Macumba LP (Amadeo Osterreichische)


Maggy Mistake  performed by Cinque Ipotesi per Irma  2000
Recommended by maggy mistake [profile]

This is a typical exemple of Noir-Music. Italian Noir Music. Very groovy and jazzy.

from maggy mistake



Main title - Vampire Killers  performed by Krzysztof Komeda  1967
Recommended by robert[o] [profile]

The perfect theme to Roman Polanski's underrated comic horror film, The Fearless Vampire Killers. With stacked vocal harmonies, suggesting the background singers at some sort of Bulgarian black mass, floating on bat wings over a very jazzy rhythm section, this song is, at once, very creepy and very funny. I have long believed that Siouxsie and The Banshees came into existence entirely due this influence of this track. (Play it back to back with "Switch" or "Israel" or "Cascade" sometime, and you'll see what I mean.) Stereolab likewise. Broadcast or Goldfrapp could do a brilliant cover of it.

from Complete Recordings Of Krzysztof Komeda Vol 19, available on CD


Miss Allen’s Blues  performed by Ernestine Allen  1961
Recommended by jeanette [profile]

Maybe it's just me getting older, but I lap this kinda stuff up these days. I can't get enough of ol' style R&B, jump blues or a song like this: swingin', heartbreaking and outstandingly sung by a woman who is undeservedly just a footnote in musical history.

Ernestine (who sometimes recorded under the name Annisteen) works her smooth chords to a blues vocal with light jazzy backing. Almost Peggy Lee like in places, but with the benefit of King Curtis' sax and an amazing rhythm section that Ernestine obviously connects with.

The lyrics are beautiful, too: "You cry so hard, you cry like you never cried before; you moan and you groan so sad, you give the blues to your neighbour next door."

from Let It Roll, available on CD



Mr. Blue Sky  performed by Electric Light Orchestra
Recommended by umbrellasfollowrain [profile]

Sweet fuck, what pure morning joy. I get a maximalist bliss-out every time I play this. But then, wait, what's that weird jazzy comeback at the end of the song? It's like an army of ghosts of all the happinesses I've ever had coming back to haunt me. It's too much. Holy cow, it's a beautiful day.





  nicegeoff: Yes. You are correct.
Neptune’s Hep Tune  performed by Antonio Carlos Jobim  1966
Recommended by delicado [profile]

An unusal Jobim track, which was recorded in Brazil and is much rougher around the edges than most of his better known work. This track explodes into action half way through with some killer jazz piano.

The big news that I just found out is that this isn't really a Jobim track at all! Apparently, this is really just the work of Deodato and Gaya, even though Jobim's name was put on the cover for the US audience.

from Love, Strings and Jobim, available on CD




  brasilnut: This song is actually "morte de um deus de sal" by Marcos Valle
  eftimihn: And actually the whole album isn't an Jobim album at all, it was originally titled "Tom Jobim apresenta". The purpose was to benefit from Jobims name (and fame) to introduce new brazilian artists to american audiences. The confusion resulted, if i remember correctly, in the fact that the musicians names were not credited on the album and people thought this must be a Jobim album.
Niki  performed by The Third Wave  1970
Recommended by Festy [profile]

It took me a while to get a copy of this album as even the out-of-print re-issue on Crippled Dick Hot Wax (that's the name of the label, folks. Promise!) sells for a bit these days. I'm glad I got it as it's a fantastic album - the only LP released by the 5 Filipino/American sister vocal group, although I think they released at least one 45". Discovered by George Duke, he wrote the arrangements and his trio of the time provides backing. The album was recorded in Germany (released by MPS) and is a little bit poppy, a little bit jazzy, a little bit funky. There are a number of songs which could be recommended (a number of them jazz standards, such as 'Maiden Voyage' and 'Cantaloupe Island'), but the one I've chosen is 'Niki'. I hadn't come across this track before getting the album, unlike a few of the other tracks which have turned up on compilations over the years.

'Niki' is a song that builds. It starts off fairly casually and builds up to a swinging chorus, accented by some very hip playing by George Duke, still on an acoustic piano during this stage of his career.

Another commendable and notable track on the album, and which I discovered through a compilation created by 'mine host' of Musical Taste, Senhor Delicado, is "Waves Lament". Absolutely fantastic.

from Here & Now, available on CD



Ode to Billy Joe  performed by Buddy Merrill  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Another amazing version of this fantastic tune. This features several very different-sounding multitracked guitars, and really is quite astounding. It feels very short at a little under 2 and a half minutes. The opening features an acoustic guitar playing a wonderfully delicate and precise rhythm, accompanied by a nice wall of strings and electric guitar hits. A twangy picked guitar plays the melody, building gradually for about a minute.

The track then explodes into a quite amazing sequence, in which a dirty-sounding fuzz guitar picks out a bassline while a manic and jazzy improvised guitar solo moves around over the top and the strings maintain some solid bluesey chords. The sound is extremely funky, and vaguely reminiscent of some tracks from the late 60s 101 strings album 'Astro Sounds from beyond the year 2000', but ends up being more tasteful. Pure genius!

from Land of a Thousand Guitars (Accent ACS 5026)
available on CD - 25 All time hits (Accent)



On a clear day you can see forever  performed by The Peddlers  1968
Recommended by mojoto [profile]

I recently (March 2002) went through my Peddlers albums and made a selection of my faves, which was exactly enough to fill an 80 minute CD. I could probably recommend any song that's on it, so why "On a clear day?" Because it never failed to cheer me up, I guess, and after 30 years it still hasn't managed to induce the slightest sign of boredom in me, because I just love Roy Phillips's singing, his characteristic smokey, velvety voice, and his fabulously stuttering hammond solo, and because of the lush stringy orchestration and Trevor Morais's typical drumbreaks. The song itself is a blast in itself too, of course, I know of a version from the same period by Cleo Laine that I also really like.

from Three in a Cell (CBS S63411)



Only You  performed by Little Richard  1964
Recommended by Arthur [profile]

Richards unique take on this standard is unlikely in the extreme.
Recorded for Vee Jay records in 1964 as am album track it seems it only appeared on 45 an "Oldie".
Almost big band in style it's about as jazzy as richard ever got-so far ! It's available on numerous re-issue albums.

I was heard a female version -same backing but different tune and lyric. I've never managed to find out what it is.

from Little Richard Is Back (Vee Jay Vee Jay LP1107)


Peace Frog  performed by The Doors
Recommended by Lubi [profile]

From the album Morrison Hotel, Peace Frog is a bouncy toe tapping tune encapsulating funky wah wah with jazzy tones and a hint of country.

What I love about this tune is it's ability to make me get up and dance, head bounce toes tap.

Facinating lyrics, quite contradictory in contrast with the merry, whimsicalness of the music.

"There’s blood in the streets’ it’s up to my ankles"

However when your dancing around It has little precedence, the organs and drums take you away and the lyrics are gone.....

from Morrison Hotel, available on CD


Pense à moi  performed by France Gall  1964
Recommended by delicado [profile]

One of a few especially jazzy and hip tracks by France Gall, I enjoy this one even more than I enjoy her more sugary pop tracks like 'Christansen'. The arrangement is quite spare - basically just France singing with a groovy small jazz combo. She also gets into some very cool scat vocals. Very, very cool.

from Ne sois pas si bête (EP) (Philips)
available on CD - Poupée de Son




  modadelic: most of france gall's 60's output from her yeh yeh bubble pop to the NOW sounds is excellent and highly recommended by moi. her compilation poupee de son is a great place to start for anyone new to the charms of france and her lovely songs. her later 70's records are not so wonderfull but then thats only my opinion, some of us may feel different. happy listening everyone.
  G400 Custom: Great song, this. I find much of her mid-60s output highly enjoyable, however throwaway they were supposed to be. 'Laisse tomber les filles' from around the same time is great too.
Prelude in Black  performed by Cy Coleman  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Both shocking and extremely cool, this has to be heard to be believed - a 'rock' adapation of Rachmanninov's Prelude in C# minor which really does rock. Cy Coleman lays a huge funky breakbeat and a heavy bassline on top of the beautifully dark, doomy theme. A jazzy guitar comes in and out as the track builds. I've never heard anything quite like it (I mean that in a good way). I am now unable to hear the original piece without Cy Coleman's breakbeat!

from The Ages of Rock (MGM)



Procissão  performed by Tamba Trio  1967
Recommended by delicado [profile]

Tamba Trio were a Brazilian jazz group more commonly praised for their jazz instrumentals than for their vocals. Their vocals on this track are nice and simple, but it is the instrumentation and arrangement which really make the song. What does it sound like? I do honestly like other types of music, but here goes: jazzy piano, bossa beat, thick strings, group vocals. Really great track, and from what I've heard of other versions, they really transformed this song, which normally sounds very different.


available on CD - Tamba Trio Classics (Polygram Brasil)



Requiem pour un con  performed by serge gainsbourg
Recommended by olli [profile]

unbelievably cool track, one of my top ten gainsbourg compositions. great jazzy sex beat, smooth vocals.
it's one of his more agressive songs, similar to the also recommended "un poison violent c'est l'amour".
there seems to be a bit of a bit of a prog vibe going on (in lack of better words, i'm not exactly an expert in the technicalities of music).
nice guitar hook. though the track is pretty repetitive, it's by no means boring. the repetition only helps to make it more intense and interesting.
taken from the film le pacha. i think a lot of gainsbourg's soundtrack work is pretty interesting stuff, though some of it often seems a bit rushed or too similar to other cool compositions from the same era (hey, i'm a sucker for plagiarism...)
the soundtrack to cannabis comes especially recommended.


available on CD - le ciinéma de serge gainsbourg, initials b.b and a bunch of othe



  n-jeff: There is an instrumental version on a twelve inch I have that sounds remarkably prescient of Metal Box era PiL: heavy repetetive bass, odd guitar noises and something about the drums, too. Great track, vocal or no.
  olli: oh, that´s awesome, n-jeff! i always wondered if there was an instrumental version...one of the funkiest white tracks ever
Rhode Island Is Famous for You  performed by Lascivious Biddies
Recommended by JMartz [profile]

Performed under its alternate title, "Coney Island", t;he Biddies' version, from their debut CD, Biddi-luxe!, swings and bops with the jazzy exuberance. If you don't know the Biddies, this is a great introduction. These girls have the chops!!





  FlyingDutchman1971: I will have to seek this one out. My favorite artist Blossom Dearie recorded a great version of it back in the 1950's. I have it listed as a recommendation on this site.
Rose Rouge  performed by St. Germain  2000
Recommended by secularus [profile]

An obvious selection for a favorite track but nonetheless truly deserved. I nearly wet my pants when I heard this track and immediately went up to the dj to ask what it was. I ran out to the record shops in town looking for it and finally found a copy a week later. That was exactly one year ago, this month, March 2001. Its repetitive cymbal/drum shimmy, combined with the samples of "I want you to get together" and "put your hands together one time" begins this journey of jazzy dancefloor heaven. Then the real electricity of the tune begins and yes its otherworldly. Slowly, the house beat teases its way into the song, until it can't take it anymore and the shit hits the fan!! If you don't know it, listen to it and see if you agree.


available on CD - Tourist (Blue Note France)



Saturday Night in Knightsbridge  performed by Rod McKuen  1968
Recommended by tinks [profile]

Lord knows that I would never recommend a McKuen vocal, but this tight, jazzy little soundtrack instrumental is quite another matter. This cut moves along rather nicely, with a cool taut rhythm. The arrangement was written by Arthur Greenslade, a longtime collaborator of both Serge Gainsbourg and Alan Hawkshaw.

from Joanna (20th Century Fox)



Sordid  performed by Amon Tobin  1998
Recommended by JerMan [profile]

funky, jazzy, hypnotic...

from Permutation (Ninja Tune)



Speak Low  performed by Harpers Bizarre  1976
Recommended by konsu [profile]

When I first came to this site I was suprised to not see any Harper's Bizarre tunes! They were a pretty fab vocal group who seem to be getting their due.

This song is from an almost unknown "lost" album from 76'. (Their heyday was the mid to late 60's, and had great success with their hit "Feelin' Groovy" in 67') And is a suprisingly jammin' version of a song from 1943 called "Speak Low" (From the film "One Touch of Venus"). I've heard other versions of this song, but nothing like this!

It starts off sounding like an O'donell Levy track, with a slinky/breezy latin step, and smooth, jazzy, compressed chords gliding across the top..... And then the vocal kicks-in, with this apropos low vocal harmony, instantly recognizable as HB, but more subdued.... They take the song and totally make it their own! Really just a superb track! Very A&M like, but with a bit more whimsy.... This record is hard to come by and needs a re-issue..... HELLO?!

HB is a must for fans of later B-boy's stuff or other Sunny pop from LA in the 60's and 70's!!!

from As Time Goes By (Forest Bay Company DS-7545-LP)



Sunny  performed by Oscar Peterson  1969
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A great take on the pop classic “sunny” - taken at a fast tempo with a bouncy piano style and a hip beat. A really great track, produced by Claus Ogerman, who really was one of the coolest arrangers; perfect for me anyway - able to perfect both lush and beat oriented 'now sound' type stuff.

from Motions and Emotions (MPS 21207137)
available on CD - Snowflakes (Motor)




  konsu: A really cool record. Also with a nice version of "Ode To Billy Joe" and Jobim's "Wave".
Sweet Surprise  performed by Blossom Dearie  1970
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

This is a track of off Dearie's second Fontana album "That's Just The Way I Want To Be". An overlooked gem of a record, unusual sounding for Blossom, blending together jazz, bossa nova and folk with nicely arranged orchestration. "Sweet Surprise" has a dream-like, airy feel with it's jazzy waltz rhythm. The album is available on the japanese "Whisper for you" compilation. Unfortunately, her first Fontana album "Soon It's Gonna Rain" from 1967, featuring lots of Jobim and Bacharach songs, has yet to be released on CD.

from That's Just The Way I Want To Be (Fontana)
available on CD - Whisper For You




  FlyingDutchman1971: The album 'Thats Just the Way I Want To Be' is now available on CD. There is also a really good Japanese compilation CD of the Fontana and Verve years called 'For Cafe Apres-midi'. Several tracks from 'Soon Its Gonna Rain' are featured so those of us who love Blossom will have to savor these meager crumbs unless the evil music overlords open the vaults.
  eftimihn: You're right and i forgot to mention the "For Cafe Apres-midi" compilation, this one features all tracks of "That's Just The Way To Be" except one track (they left out the opening track, not a bad choice though since it's the weakest track on the album and not quite fitting to the rest of the songs). Unfortunately there are just 2 songs from "Soon It's Gonna Rain", Meditation and Dindi, on it. But these sound absolutely gorgeous, arranged with some very cool harp embellishments. Too bad the entire album hasn't been picked up by some japanese label yet.
  konsu: Great song, great album, great singer/composer. Why she's not completely worshipped in the USA I have no idea. I really have to disagree with eftimihn on the opening track, it's in my opinion one of the coolest things she ever did! Sure her jazzy renditions of evergreens and her more hip stuff are great, but to stretch out like she does on "That's Just the Way" is just sublime. What was she doing there? Some kind of CA inspired latin/folk/psyche-pop? Genius! True, it isn't like the rest of the album... Also her great take on Frishbergs "Long Daddy Green" is worth mentioning for it's uniqueness.
Takin’ So Long  performed by Alzo  1972
Recommended by mariacuccia [profile]

This album was long overdue on its release. It was recorded by Alzo in 1972 while signed to Bell Records. The album was recently released in Japan Arista/BMG. Produced by Bob Dorough, (Multiplication Rock) the music possesses a jazzy folk feel with a great deal of brazilian soul. Alzo's story is just as impressive as his music....

from Takin' So Long, available on CD


The Shark  performed by Hugo Montenegro  1968
Recommended by delicado [profile]

A stunning soundtrack piece, 'the shark' opens with a catchy bass riff. Montenegro then uses an Ennio Morricone-style instrumentation with harpsichord and strings to build the theme. The tempo changes unsettlingly as the theme continues through an incredibly atmospheric three minutes.

from Lady in Cement
available on CD - Ninfadelica (Irma)



This Afternoon  performed by Chad Mitchell  1967
Recommended by konsu [profile]

I almost know nothing about the Chad Mitchell trio, except that John Denver was in the group. I'm not even sure that this is the same guy for that matter. I guess it's really not too suprising that an old folkie would team-up with geniuses like Bob Dorough & Stu Scharf for a little boot in the ass, since those guys seemed to be working a lot of crossover pop material. That's really the reason I picked this up, basically to see what could happen.

The record ends up being incredible actually. Imagine a mix of "golden throat" type schmaltz, Tom Rapp-ish hip folk, Nilssonesque melodrama, and the poetic and jazzy humor of Scharf & Dorough and that will sum it up. It can grow on you for sure.

This track is in the sort of word jazz thing in a highly characterized way hard to describe without taking up too much space... just listen. I think this was a piece from an Alan Arkin LP. Suppose I will have to get one of those now.

from Love, A Feeling Of (Warner Brothers WS 1706)




  b. toklas: The album "Chad" on Bell records is the one to get. Great songs (by Jake Holmes, Joni Mitchell and others) and fantastic arrangements. Hal Blaine and a couple of other wrecking crew members and great musicians are on it, too. In places it also reminds me of the group H.P. Lovecraft. So it might even be interesting for lovers of psychedelic music (not for those who hate strings, of course). I wonder if I should call it a masterpiece.
  artlongjr: I second that on the "Chad" album...it's terrific. There's a 7-minute plus cover of Tim Buckley's "Goodbye and Hello" on there that rather stunned me, since it seems like a very challenging song to sing. The H.P.Lovecraft connection comes through Chicago producer Bill Traut, who owned Dunwich Records (the album is a Dunwich production). Traut was involved with H.P. Lovecraft, and of course the Shadows of Knight.
Through The Sky  performed by Swing Out Sister  2001
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

When mentioning Swing Out Sister casual listeners often dismiss them as forgettable, mere 80s martini pop kitsch. Or worse, one hit wonders due to the fact that their 1987 offering Breakout is still, by far, their biggest single hit. But this is completely wrong. In fact, they're enjoying an ongoing career for almost 20 years, recording 8 studio albums. Nowadays they’re fitting a niche no other group fits in so comfortably: escapist, late 60s oriented sophisticated glamorous easy listening pop music with all the right influences that spring to mind of that era: Burt Bacharach, Jimmy Webb, John Barry, late 60s european soundtracks in general, Ennio Morricone specifically and sunshine pop. Since these guys aren't necessarily household names in mainstream pop culture today, Swing Out Sister were practically invisible from the mid 90s on in Europe and the USA, releasing their records primarily in Japan, where easy listening music still gets the biggest exposure. The Sisters’ 2001 album “Somewhere deep in the night” is their most cinematic, most elegant and visually evocative album to date, where the Bacharach/Barry/Morricone spirit is prevailing the most: 60s arrangements with Bacharach-oriented songwriting, Barry-esque lush strings, Morricone-style harpsicord, saxophone, harps, jazzy guitars, muted trumpets, fluegelhorn, wordless vocals, blending vocal songs with atmospheric instrumentals, creating an imaginary soundtrack. The whole album is a truly underrated gem.

from Somewhere Deep In The Night, available on CD




  jeanette: I have to say I am thoroughly delighted at learning of the continued career of SOS. I always had time for them, and thought Breakout was actually the weakest of the singles I heard. I particularly remember liking 'Fooled By A Smile' and 'You On My Mind'. Hearing the snippets of these songs here, I can say I'm intrigued enough to try and seek out some of this later work. It reminds me of the more produced end of Siesta records' (Spanish easy-pop label) output.
  eftimihn: You probably should try "Shapes and Patterns" from 1997 first, it's pretty much in the vein of 1989's "Kaleidoscope World" and thus a good starting point to rediscover SOS. This and the aforementioned "Somewhere Deep In The Night" (2001) as well.
today  performed by tom scott and the california dreamers  1967
Recommended by norfy [profile]

had this on a tape for ages and have recently found a japanese copy of the cd on impulse-awesome jazz/soft/easy vibes straight out of the free design school of harmonies-today [ a jefferson airplane cover i believe] is a jazzy/psych number that makes me half close my eyes and dream of places far away and times past-i would recommend the rest of the album too-all soft pop and sitar jazz...mush better than his fusion nonsense [bar the theme to starsky and hutch] from the 70's.the album is called the honey suckle breeze and is a revelation.

from the honeysuckle breeze, available on CD


Tracy Had a Hard Day Sunday  performed by West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band  1967
Recommended by songs-I-love [profile]

One beautifully-constructed, jazz-flavoured number.
Its jazzy chords and conga rhythm are complemented by a set of psychedelic lyrics about Tracy who "had a hard day Sunday" for "she had to be herself and no one else". Real ear-candy for me. One of the best (mildly) psychedelic tracks out there, ever.

from West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band, Vol. 2: Breaking Through (Reprise)



  executiveslacks: I was going to recommend this one, but you beat me to it. Great song.
Two Shots of Happy, One Shot of Sad  performed by Nancy Sinatra  2004
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Nancy Sinatra joined the Attack Records family with the 2004 self-titled release, "Nancy Sinatra". She contacted artists that she and her daughters admire such as Morrissey, Jarvis Cocker, and Thurston Moore among others and found that these artists were also fans of hers and were eager to collaborate with her on the new album.

This song is U2's contribution to the album. Bono and The Edge wrote the song and Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen provided bass and drums on the recording.

The song is a beautiful slow jazzy ballad in which the lyrics compare the good things in life as shots of "happy" and the harsh moments as shots of "sad".

from Nancy Sinatra, available on CD


Two Star  performed by Everything But The Girl  1994
Recommended by eftimihn [profile]

To me, Everything But The Girl are one of the most memorable bands of the 80s and 90s. What always strikes me is how their sound evolved from jangly, jazzy-pop in the beginning to polished, rather slick sophisti-pop in the late 80s/early 90s to sample-heavy, drum & bass/trip-hop influenced, house-embracing electronica at the end of their recording history in the mid/late 90s. Despite the change in sound they always managed to capture a consistency in the feel of the music, always revolving around the same themes over the years, dripping with melancholia, unrequited love, self-pity, romantic disillusionment etc. "Two Star" is a delicate, yet emotionally bleak ballad. Acoustic in sound, with piano, double bass and a wonderful string arrangement by Harry Robinson plus some cor anglais embellishments by Kate St. John.

from Amplified Heart, available on CD



Wild Women  performed by The Big Three (featuring "Mama" Cass Elliott  1964
Recommended by FlyingDutchman1971 [profile]

Cass Elliott at her sassy best. A jazzy/bluesy song wherein Ms. Elliott lays it on the line. If her man doesn't do right by her she is going to send him packing!
This world is a slightly dimmer place since Cass departed...

from Live From the Recording Studio (Warner Bros Records FM LP 311)
available on CD - Live From the Recording Studio / Dream a Little Dream - the Cass Elliott Collection (Collectibles B00004YNF5 / MCAD 11532)


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